Nuts and Bolts of Fitness Coaching

I label myself a fitness, health, and performance coach. The reach of fitness and health is broad, wide, diverse and expansive. It’s almost impossible to quantify the power your physical and mental fitness has on the rest of your life. No matter how successful you may be in other areas of your life, if you don’t have a high standard of fitness and health, you will lack performance.

My approach is simple. Get fit. Be healthy. Stay confident. Fit. Healthy. Confident. It flows right? I believe in coaching for one simple reason: accountability. In most areas of our lives deadlines imposed on us by others. Appointments, due dates, responsibilities, etc. all work to structure our weekly flow. When adding something personal into that mix, such as fitness training, it is paramount that the importance of this addition is treated as highly as those imposed on you by others. This is where your accountability coach comes in.

A few tools I employ to make sure you stay on track and have success:

  1. Private Fitness Training App/Website
  2. A requirement that all fitness and health activities be recorded and tracked.
  3. Sunday night check-in.
  4. Upgrade: “live” training via facetime, skype or other video calling service.
  5. Consequences for non-compliance. If you aren’t participating, you are gone.

Do you run a marathon to get to the finish line? Seems like a lot of hard work to simply stop the clock, right? No, you run a marathon to experience the journey along the way. From the day you commit to the process your life begins to change. No excuses. Do what has to be done to be successful!

Smart Training = Avoiding Fatigue

Have you ever experienced the feeling of decreased self-control, or willpower due to simply being tired? I know I have. Finishing a long run, depleted, I’m susceptible to cravings and impulses I simply do not normally have. Sweets, carbs, bread, beer, etc. Following the “positive” comes a negative.

What do you think this is telling your body?

The same can be seen in the effects of excessive high-intensity interval training. Crushing workouts followed by fatigue, lead to diminished discipline and heightened reward signals.


  1. Know the purpose of your training:
    1. Why are you exercising? Body composition change? Image enhancement? Mental and physical performance? Hobby?
    2. Your purpose should direct the type of exercise you employ, as well as your nutritional needs.
  2. Avoid the extremes:
    1. Injuries happen when you ignore the signals your body is giving you. Excessive fatigue before, during or after exercise is a “Red Flag” to be respected. Stop and reassess.
    2. Only use a training weight that you can manage effectively. Ignore rep counts that you can’t mentally stay engaged long enough to handle.
    3. Where the mind goes the body follows. If 100% focus is not happening, then stop the exercise. More harm than benefit may be had on this day.
  3. Leave a little in the tank:
    1. Learn to leave something in the tank for the other events of your day, or tomorrows workout. Consistency and repetition are where your results will come from, not the temporary beat down of too much too soon and subsequent delayed recovery.
  4. Exercise in a 1:1 environment or alone:
    1. Distractions help pass the time, but it is not passing the time that we are after.
    2. Mind/Body is not a byproduct. Manifest the desired outcome and picture it happening.
  5. Less is More:
    1. Simply put. Learning to engage a muscle, what it feels like to achieve a proper contraction and seeking that feeling each repetition will give you amazing results.
    2. Eating less frees your body up to focus on aspects other than digestion and recovery.
    3. Less time spent exercising means more time spent living with your fitness.

Remember that your fitness and health are positive enhancers to your lifestyle. Engage in the learning process. Mastering a few key aspects of movement will do more for your health than any amount of variety can muster.

Onward and Upward!

Mornings

Protect your mornings. As the first few minutes pass and you begin to awaken, turn your attention to your favorite form of movement. Move the body to prime the mind for what is about to occur, and what may lie ahead throughout the day.

This time is precious. Do not put off what can be accomplished right away.
Win the day. Accomplish more in your first 90 minutes of awakening than you could ever imagine as they day wears on and its effects weaken your resolve.

Rituals of habit, work. Continually showing up, engaging, and finishing are qualities that transfer to other areas of your life.

Week of 11/18-11/24 Training

Monday:

80 Minute Indoor Trainer Workout. Roech Zonneveld #14

Tuesday:

5 x (1-6 Pull-Ups) = 105

Then:

5 x Goblet Squats, 53 lb KB

10 x Swings, 53 lb KB

10 rounds

Then

5:00 Plank

Then

30:00 Row

Wednesday:

50 minute Reoch-Zonnevold #15… hard intervals!

100 x Double KB Bench Press, 2 x 53 lb KB’s

Thursday:

5 Minute Airdyne

Then

10 x Pull-Ups

1 minute airdyne

3 rounds

Then

5 minute row

Then

10-6 Squat Press @ 35 lb DB’s

100 meter row sprint after each set of Squat Press

Then

10 minute airdyne (easy, cooldown, 195 calories)

Friday:

50 minute run. Mostly trail. 6.3 miles. Took it very easy, coming back from 13 days off of running. Building the base back up.

Then

10-1 Ladder, very strict form

Pull-ups (chest to bar)

Push-ups (no wasted movement)

Saturday:

50:00 Run, 6.5 miles, Hidden Falls loop x 5

Goblet and lunge warm-up

Then

10-1 Ladder

Burpee Pull-Ups

Kettlebell Swings @ 53# KB

Then

10-8-6-4-2

Dips

Plate Sweeps @ 45#

Then

5:00 Ring Plank… made it 3:00, then dropped feet off box and did 1 x pushup every :10 until time was up.

Got way behind on nutrition. Felt it the rest of the day.

Sunday:

40 minute recovery on bike trainer

Then

Suspension core work

3 x 5 Double KB, 1-leg Deadlifts

A few pull-ups in between sets