Find Your Limiter

Your Limiter

Simple movements will expose you. Therefore, they should be, and are, all you need to evolve in your body-knowledge. Developing an understanding of what skilled movement patterns require takes patience and commitment.

I thoroughly enjoy this process! Lowering repetitions, yet keeping time under tension high has forced me to engage more, mentally.

In my profession, the plank allows me to assess where the client is weak. Their limiter could be core-strength, unactivated glutes, poor leg-tension, weak chest, weak shoulders, weak triceps, or an un-present mind. Movements are linked and connected, thus, how you do one thing is how you do everything.

Modifications are numerous. The plank can be performed from your knees, or with hands on an elevated bench, chair, or bar. Yoga blocks and parallettes are fun additions.

Simple Implementation. 1:00 Plank. 1:00 Squats. 1:00 Walking Lunges. 1:00 Rest. Repeat three times.

Free your mind and make it happen.

Simple is Sophisticated

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” – Da Vinci

Simple is key, but simple isn’t easy.

Exercise, for most, is a small part of our lives. A means to an end. Keeping it simple and efficient requires a skill of practice that is not instantly obtained. In order to excel with this concept: repetition, discipline, and desire must be harnessed consistently.

  • Coaching is an accelerator.
    • Accountability ensures.
    • Progress comes quicker.
    • Results are seen sooner.
  • With trust and commitment change is possible.
  • Our species thrives on forward/upward movement.
    • Feeling the momentum of progress is addicting.
    • Chasing the idol of physicality is never-ending. Mastery is an illusion applicable to no physical endeavor.

Endurance is repetition / Movement molds / Breath is fluidity & connection

The effective minimum dosage of the physical permits frequency.

  • Continuation.
  • Progression.
  • Evolution.

Where does this lead us?

Guided, online coaching requires you to be heavily engaged in the workout. Focused and attentive. Understanding the stimulus. Adjusting resistance or rep count to elicit the proper feeling. There is no “plug and play” concept to exercise. Questioning if the movement warrants the response. You will never skip this step. Avoiding failure is smart for most. Quality repetition leads to increased frequency via efficient recovery.

Desired results. Efficiently delivered. Sounds nice, doesn’t it?

The Absolute Minimum

Life, it happens. Work and family demands often interrupt our personal time for health and exercise. When this compounds from a single training session to multiple days or heaven forbid weeks, you have a problem. Time stops for nothing. Thus, the prioritization of self is truly not a choice. It’s a habit. Learning to say “no” is a skill that needs to be trained. When you respect yourself, others, in turn, show you more respect and understand your value.

Here are some tips to make things happen when you’re forced to modify.

  1. Have a list of “go-to” exercises you can quickly engage with. Ideally, these create a large oxygen demand, lending themselves to higher repetition training, via one continuous set, or multiple sets linked with short rest.
    1. Kettlebell Swings
    2. DB Cleans
    3. Squat Thrusts or Burpees
    4. Walking or Standing Reverse Lunges
    5. Step-Ups: weighted or unweighted
    6. Plank Mobility Complexes
  2. Short cardio bouts are good to implement as well.
    1. Warm-up for 5 minutes easy.
    2. Intervals: 10 x (:15 hard / :45 easy) or (:30 hard / :30 easy)
    3. Cooldown with 5 minutes easy.

Remind yourself to ask the question “how can I,” instead of stating “I can’t.” You can do it. Send me an email, give me a call, I’m here to help you implement, strategize and succeed.

Onward and Upward!

Resistance

Resistance

The mind controls it all. It fabricates, incentivizes, dramatizes, and elicits emotion in nearly every moment of our lives. Focusing the mind to be fully connected with what we are doing, when we are doing it, is a skill that when possessed, is the most powerful of them all.

When I define a goal it often has loose consequences. It’s arbitrary whether or not I succeed or fail. Those who love me do not place value on my performance, therefore the prioritization is all my own. The preparation, planning, and sacrifices are my own. To achieve a best performance in this regard requires a very strong mind. A high level of personal importance is required in order to give everything to my goal, or event. My events are long. Anywhere from 3 to 24+ hours. Knowing this I focus on not looking forward to the end of a training session. At the point the training becomes uncomfortable, for any reason, intended or not, I must be in the moment. The mind connects with the feeling of the body; am I tired, thirsty, hungry? What of those things can I control? Am I slowing down? If I am, it’s most likely due to the mind letting the body take control and forgetting proper self-care. I must also focus on positive thoughts. Reassuring the purpose of the event and its priority in my life. This is where I want to be.

General fitness training fails when there is no consequence.

“A lot of people try to get around goals by not being specific enough. Your goals have to be quantifiable with a by-when date!”

Commitment and priority are quick to waiver. Your body will put up a fight to any sort of change: dietary, sleep, workout, and schedule. Understanding and expecting this is mandatory. Giving your self the option of cancelling or saying no is the beginning of the end. You must commit. Clearly define why you want to make changes. Superficial, image based goals can spur you to begin training, but when things get tough, they are not strong enough to keep you on track. Do you want to be an example to your family and friends? This can’t simply be a nice surprise. Please don’t dabble. Being an active participant in your life means eliminating the passivity in how you approach each day. Train with vigor.

“Short-Time” Workouts

“Short-Time” Workouts

Ease of implementation is the most important factor in a busy, professional’s ability to consistently workout. It should be no surprise that consistency, with proper application, is the most important factor in relation to obtaining results.

We are going to assume that motivation and desire is not lacking, just organization. A sets and repetitions based strength workout does not require a 60-90 minute commitment to be effective. In fact, 30-45 minutes of focused effort is plenty of time to get results. Even, 10-15 minutes can be enough time to create balance in your physique and make small, consistent improvements. Let’s focus on the 10-15 minute, “short-time”, workouts.

Organization:

In order to be effective in your training there must be organization and planning. What do I need to do today, this week, and this month to make the progress I need to get the results I desire? How do I start and finish a workout?

Time:

Knowing, realistically, how much time (each day) you can devote to working out is crucial. The ego always believes we have more time, and a greater ability to complete tasks than we actually do. Set for yourself a high-end (ego-based) time allotment, as well as a low-end (reality based) time allotment. Always start with the low end. It allows a lot of upward mobility and with completion and consistency, comes confidence.

Knowledge:

This is the most important factor, which means it is always the biggest results limiting factor. Strength training can also be extremely confusing. With all of the tools, props, machines, and programs on the market it can be a foreign realm to step into. This is why classes are so popular. People sign up and follow along. The problem with most classes is there is no evolution or progression built into the programming, creating a reliance and dependency on the class format and structure to stay fit. Knowledge, meaning knowing how to workout, is empowering, it creates ownership of your health and fitness. Once you own it, you simply need to apply it. It’s that simple.

Example:

Being a distance runner, most of my energy for training is devoted to running. Strength training takes a backburner to endurance work pretty much all the time in my world. Does that mean I don’t do it? Of course not, but what I do is place restrictions on frequency and duration of these workouts. During my running season,10-15 minutes, 3 days per week is my allotment for strength training. In that time I’m pulling, pushing, lunging, stepping, squatting and planking. Knowing my time is limited I work off a plan and focus on flow, moving from one movement to the next, always finishing feeling like I could have done a lot more. Compressing my time commitment increases my focus. Quality becomes more important than quantity. The stress of chasing fatigue, and muscular exhaustion is eliminated.

Implement:

It may take 8 minutes, or 15…

10-1 Ladder Circuit (10,9,8,7,…1):

  • Squats of Swings
  • Pushups
  • Sit-Ups

Theory:

The more we promote balance in our life the less susceptible we are to the burnout of over exertion, over consumption, and general “life-binging” most Americans engage in and are attracted to.

Think about it, for many people working out is a means to allow them to, “eat and drink whatever I want.” I hear this all the time. This idea of balancing the good behaviors with the bad behaviors is not sustainable and will never be equal.

As a coach and trainer I prioritize balance, completion, and consistency. When I talk about making fitness a lifestyle, it’s not simply being active more often. I’m speaking about taking the values and ethos of exercise and fitness and implementing them to all other areas of your life.

Creating a state of flow, via movement, is transcending. Once it’s felt, the value becomes inherent, an un-fleeting element of one’s existence, and a way of life.

Conclusion:

10, 15, 20-minutes… it’s enough to make a difference.

Works… things… details… basic… results

Find out what works, and then do more of it. Focus first on doing the right things, and then on doing things right by mastering details. A few basic moves produce most results.

-Joe Polish

Brilliant message. It’s clear, concise, factual, and blunt. Eat real food. Eat more of it. Move your body. Move it more often. Challenge yourself. Keep challenging yourself, and maybe even compete…

Whether it’s the first squat, pushup, or pull up. Whether it’s the first smoothie, spinach salad, or grilled salmon. Without intention and purpose their is no follow up of positive action. Being habitual in your behavior is what produces the most.

Plan, track, implement, and assess. If you’ve done it right, you walk away with an education. If you’ve bought a shortcut, you’re left with a dependency.

Make the right move.