On Reflection…

You tell me that I make no difference… at least I’m fucking trying… what the fuck have you done? It’s in my eyes… and it doesn’t look that way to me in my eyes.

–– Minor Threat

I move to connect. Life is engagement with environment. Choice. Do not expect an outcome. No expectation, no judgment. Time is a mere reflection of passing. Abandon past associations. Connect with presence.

Possessions distract from that which gives life. Creativity, the elixir of experience, thrives on simplicity.

The less I feel the need to do the more life becomes spontaneous. Structure heightens productivity, yet smothers the creative force of the instant.

In motion, I am free to be. Moving rhythmically, I commune with free-space, absent any labels (sex, status, age, race, etc.) my expression is pure. In this moment I am free to follow my thoughts, set an intention, initiate action, and live out my expectations.

Upon completion, I am at peace. Stillness arrives in the space created by exertion. Here I sit with coffee, pencil, and paper. Warmth and elevated heart rate replaced with a clear mind and present thought. To communicate thought through writing is to live life twice.

Clarity may not always arrive, but when it does, so too follows flow.

Initiate. Experience. Reflect.

2018 Bighorn 100

Strength:

Preparation is More Profitable than Reparation

Lifting – Calisthenics – Repetition – Resistance – Tension

When done right, controlled, quality movements alter our physique. Moving through a full range of motion properly flexes each muscle and strengthens the body. When done incorrectly, mindlessly, injury, imbalance, and poor biomechanics develop.

Refrain from chasing fatigue. Elevated HR should be momentary in the realm of strength as it is not sustainable, and its effects on performance are profound. Learn to breathe and maximize your repetitions. Build on the finishing rep, stopping at a pre-determined number, or when form, ROM, or mental fatigue dictates.

  1. Quality > Quantity
  2. Repetition = Practice… perfect practice is the way
  3. Avoid training a fatigued movement or body part
  4. Master bodyweight exercise, learn to flex the working muscles
  5. Understand tension. Apply it from the ground up. Contact points force tension
  6. Analyze effort in the present moment. One focused rep > many poor reps
  7. Mind (logic). Body (tool). Will (desire, belief). Heart (passion, purpose, potential).

Source: heart space. To satisfy the heart is a basic human desire. The body is your vessel. It feeds and stimulates the mind. Carefully assess desire by logically analyzing feelings.

The mind sees an image or an ideal and forms purpose around that concept. At times, the heart is hard to hear. But, if you give it a voice, it will promote what feels purposeful.

Passion + Purpose + Potential = YOU

  • Passion: Enjoyment + Positivity
  • Purpose: Improvement + Health + Ability
  • Potential: Effort + Commitment + Genetics

Purpose. Act with intention. Feel better more often. Create positivity. Participate in your health with knowledge that you are addressing a need. Honor the mental benefit of completion. Confidence. Feed a need: to sweat, get fresh air, get outside, get sunshine, loosen up, exert, socialize, practice a movement, address an injury, gain a skill, prepare for an event, activity, sport or vacation. Increase self-esteem and body satisfaction. Cultivate your self-image to experience your best life.

Your will to engage and participate is dependent on the purpose. Define it… tattoo it to your soul. Lifestyle. Feel it, think it, absorb it and eventually you will become it. Things take time. My belief is that we arrive at our destination regardless of time. The connection of mind + body + soul is not one that can be rushed/forced. Get passionate about it. Explore your potential. Commit to learning, practicing, and engaging with effort. You can’t fake passion. It’s not coming from your mind. Logic rationalizes. Passion comes from the heart and soul, creating a desire to do the thing, to have the experience. Desire leads to repetition, which exposes and fosters potential.

Live purposefully in this moment. Create a passion in your life that enhances and allows you to experience the visceral rewards of an active, athletic lifestyle. Blend the intellectual with the physical. Recognize that convenience of our modern lifestyles has removed the natural act of movement and the stimulation of the senses that comes from a physical activity.

If any part of your uncertainty is a conflict between your heart and your mind – follow your mind. — John Galt

The mind is rational. It assesses the choice… the fork in the road… using past experience to guide your decision. Past forms present, creating future. If your mind is clear and honest it may open a new door, restore dormant confidence, or expose a hidden truth. Listen. The heart connects you to the spiritual, earthly, and celestial. Aliveness and sense of passion flow from the heart.

If you don’t agree with something don’t do it. But don’t do it because that’s what people do. – Ian Mackaye

The purpose of strength training is to place you (mind/thought/self) in direct confrontation with your body. Explore, express, then learn. What makes sense to you, as you are, at this moment? Presence matters more than progression. Your success is dependent on attitude, not situation. The observational point of view removes emotion from the analysis. Step back.

ORIGINALITY AND INTENSITY > FORMAL TRAINING AND STRUCTURE

The strength to break bonds to the past is in the braking of present habits of mind and body. Others may inspire us, but it is through our own struggles that we live the heroic journey. From this point on refuse to shy from (the potential of) fatigue, failure, and disappointment. Action creates whereas stagnation destroys. For our lives have the potential to be the stories that inspire those whom we know well, and those we may never meet. It is through action that we may rewrite the human story. To create something meaningful you must love the expression of your heart more than you love yourself.

Find Your Limiter

Your Limiter

Simple movements will expose you. Therefore, they should be, and are, all you need to evolve in your body-knowledge. Developing an understanding of what skilled movement patterns require takes patience and commitment.

I thoroughly enjoy this process! Lowering repetitions, yet keeping time under tension high has forced me to engage more, mentally.

In my profession, the plank allows me to assess where the client is weak. Their limiter could be core-strength, unactivated glutes, poor leg-tension, weak chest, weak shoulders, weak triceps, or an un-present mind. Movements are linked and connected, thus, how you do one thing is how you do everything.

Modifications are numerous. The plank can be performed from your knees, or with hands on an elevated bench, chair, or bar. Yoga blocks and parallettes are fun additions.

Simple Implementation. 1:00 Plank. 1:00 Squats. 1:00 Walking Lunges. 1:00 Rest. Repeat three times.

Free your mind and make it happen.

Does your training lift you up, or beat you down?

Assessing how you feel before, during, and after a training session is essential.

Some things to consider while training:

  1. Stress comes when you don’t feel in control. After you’ve done the movement in a few training sessions there should be no stress associated. If it stresses you out or requires too much effort to complete, move on to an exercise you can safely complete.
  2. Rep count does not matter. This is exercise not a prescription or competition. A few good, quality repetitions are better than many partial or cheated ones.
  3. Modifications are good. Have trouble with walking lunges? Use trekking poles, or do them in place, next to something you can use for balance (couch, bench, etc.).
  4. Weight. Start light. Take your time. If you can move it easily, work your way up. When it challenges you, stay there for a few sessions to build confidence in the exercise, set or workout. Repetition trumps variety.

How do you feel after a set? Stressed, exhausted, out of control? Those feelings are to be, mostly, avoided. Anxiety, fear, and worry don’t lend themselves to repetitive behavior. On the other hand, elation, positive energy, and enthusiasm build confidence and pleasure, which lead to increased repetition.

  1. Find out what you enjoy and repeat it.
  2. Build skills in 5 or so exercises you can go back to on a daily basis. Developing skill leads to the ability to increase resistance and difficulty. Variety is not necessary.
  3. Remember why you are exercising: to progress, maintain, become more able/capable, increase energy, increase outlook, enhance performance in all areas, and improve both health and quality of life.

Forced oxygenation and deep breathing change your bodies chemistry. This is a bonus to strength training in a circuit format. Transitioning and actively recovering while training is a skill that once possessed, powerfully changes your approach to movement.

Until you have the skillset you shouldn’t seek out the pain and strain of hard training. Shortcuts lead nowhere worth going. Time spent in foundation building is never wasted.

Think of your fitness training as building skillsets to last a lifetime. Moving well throughout your life is more important than momentary glory obtained in youth.

The Absolute Minimum

Life, it happens. Work and family demands often interrupt our personal time for health and exercise. When this compounds from a single training session to multiple days or heaven forbid weeks, you have a problem. Time stops for nothing. Thus, the prioritization of self is truly not a choice. It’s a habit. Learning to say “no” is a skill that needs to be trained. When you respect yourself, others, in turn, show you more respect and understand your value.

Here are some tips to make things happen when you’re forced to modify.

  1. Have a list of “go-to” exercises you can quickly engage with. Ideally, these create a large oxygen demand, lending themselves to higher repetition training, via one continuous set, or multiple sets linked with short rest.
    1. Kettlebell Swings
    2. DB Cleans
    3. Squat Thrusts or Burpees
    4. Walking or Standing Reverse Lunges
    5. Step-Ups: weighted or unweighted
    6. Plank Mobility Complexes
  2. Short cardio bouts are good to implement as well.
    1. Warm-up for 5 minutes easy.
    2. Intervals: 10 x (:15 hard / :45 easy) or (:30 hard / :30 easy)
    3. Cooldown with 5 minutes easy.

Remind yourself to ask the question “how can I,” instead of stating “I can’t.” You can do it. Send me an email, give me a call, I’m here to help you implement, strategize and succeed.

Onward and Upward!

Sustainable Approaches To Health and Fitness

The mind’s first step to self-awareness must be through the body. Exercise and athletics are growth. -George Sheehan

How to get the most results / success / gains / change, from the least amount of training? We all want answers to this question. As a fitness professional, having a template that conforms and applies to all individuals would be a dream. Countless hours have been spent trying to create such a product, or system to no avail. Yet, the consumer still desires, and in many cases expects to be offered such products (shake weight, 8-minute abs, 10 minute trainer, perfect pushup, etc…). Substantial physical change requires a lifestyle intervention, drastic measures, and extreme discipline. What are you willing to invest?

  1. Seek improvement and enhancement. Is this visual? Probably not so much. Can you feel it and describe it? Definitely. Does it make you happy? Hopefully. This can be an exercise, a series of exercises, an activity, a sport, or a competitive challenge. Enjoyment. Engagement. Improvement.
  2. Work with a coach, trainer, or specialist to get feedback. This is time well spent. Confidence builder. Very helpful in the day to day, week to week process.
  3. Career enhancement. We spend most of our time working on and in our careers. A huge portion of our life’s satisfaction comes from our chosen careers. Most of us are professional workers, not athletes. What exercises, workouts, and activities can help correct physical imbalances obtained from our jobs? How can they enhance my ability to perform at work? Can being more physically fit help me advance my ___ career? These are the questions to ask yourself, repeatedly.
  4. Know the Impact of Your Choices. If you are a top physician, researcher, educator, or attorney, etc. deciding to invest 15 hours each week into training for a triathlon most likely will have a negative impact on other areas of your life, in which you are already successful. Your optimal fitness may be obtained with as little as 45 minutes of cardiovascular exercise 5 days per week, and 15 minutes of strength training 3 days per week. Simple, right? Knowing the best, most practical approach to your lifestyle demands is key.
  5. For many of us the endurance activities are all we will ever need. Jogging, cycling, walking, hiking, playing… loving and committing to every moment of it.

The time benefit equation is delicate and constantly evolving. Understand yours, be flexible and forgiving, and optimize your fitness practice to give your life the most benefit.

Exercise is done against one’s wishes and maintained only because the alternative is worse. Happiness is different from pleasure. Happiness has something to do with struggling and enduring and accomplishing. We are our bodies, our bodies are us. Satisfaction is such a minor thing. Joy is what we want. -George Sheehan

Effective Strategies For Health and Wellness Pt. 2

The previous post was a bit of an extended lead in to this one. Now, onto the nuts bolts of applying and implementing knowledge.

Sleep/Wake:

  1. Get to bed on time. Put some closure on the day. Plan the next days events, including your workout time. Schedule everything.
  2. Wake up EARLY. Just a few minutes at first. This is step #1 in winning your day.

Nutrition:

  1. Schedule a cheat-day. Keep it the same day, no matter what your week entails. I like Saturday.
  2. Keep foods out of the house that are known culprits of indulgence: alcohol, peanut butter, potato chips, any and all sweet or savory snacks.
  3. Hydrate first. When feeling tempted to eat, or overindulge at a restaurant, drink a large glass of water first. Then, make the proper decision.
  4. Join or start your own group, for accountability purposes. Believe me, there is power in numbers when seeking to elicit change. Well established, in place, peer and work groups are great places to start. Who doesn’t want to make positive change?

Cardio/Aerobic:

  1. Think about activities you’ve been interested in in the past. If they’ve gone completely dormant ask yourself why, then decide if their benefit could possibly outweigh their cost. With a new mindset/outlook/goal you might be surprised at the answer.
  2. Get it in before the day starts. Four days each week wake up to that early alarm and start moving. I find getting it in before sunrise gives me a lot of power and momentum to seize the day. Start with 20-30 minutes for the first 6-weeks. Patiently increase your time each subsequent week until you reach that 50 minute sweet spot.
  3. In areas or times of inclement weather, or simply if you prefer indoor exercise, try utilizing media to make the time pass and gather knowledge at the same time.
  4. Seek enjoyment! The mind is powerful. If you believe what you are doing is improving your health, giving you more enjoyment, and increasing quality of life, you are more likely to be proud of it.

Strength:

  1. Keep it super simple (K.I.S.S.). No sense being overly creative here. The same exercises that worked in the early 20th century still work in the early 21st century.
  2. Be creative in your programming. Utilize ladders, timers, games, competitions, and keep track of your workout totals.
    1. Max reps in 10/20/30/60 minutes. Take 1-3 bodyweight exercises and do as many reps as possible in the allotted time period. Squats, lunges, pull ups, push ups, and dips work best here. Metabolic conditioning movements, such as burpees or squat thrusts are great as well, but don’t combine these with the other movements as they are most effective, in this format, when isolated.
    2. Kettlebells. Simple and sinister. Check these out, but be sure to learn proper form and technique. The best exercises are the Goblet Squat and the Swing.
    3. Deadlifts. If you’ve got a background in strength training, you’ve probably done a few deadlifts. Check out the form here, and then keep the reps simple. Build a solid base of 5-10 reps at 100-150% of bodyweight before cranking out super heavy sets.
  3. Rest 48-72 hours between workouts. Unlike cardio, it’s not advised to “lift” on consecutive days. You can get away with this in your youth, with hormones raging, but let commonsense play out and recover properly. Proper recovery insures we absorb these hard training sessions.

Yoga/Stretching:

  1. Do it. Once a week, minimum, spend 45-60 minutes breathing and stretching.
  2. Focus on the hips, low back, and shoulders. Breathing is everything here.
  3. The foam roller can be extremely therapeutic. I use it as a passive activity for my back and spine, but you can get extremely involved with it.

Search, Seek and Employ. The solutions are right in front of your eyes. Make the time. Make it happen.

Onward, Jake Lawrence

Checking In: Connecting Trainer with Client

“If you are prepared, have confidence and persevere, you will always have the edge.” Howard Ferguson

As a personal trainer, I find the most difficulty and dissatisfaction in those days in between my training sessions with my clients. On the way to meet the trainee I’m pondering how their week went. Did they workout? Eat well? How are they sleeping and recovering? Days always turn into weeks, turn into months, and eventually years. Time is always of the essence, so for me, finding a program that allows me to be connected and locked in with my clients in the virtual world is essential, but until now, it wasn’t a reality.

Trainerize, an online personal training software has changed the game for me. My plan is to fully integrate all clients into it’s usage moving forward. The ability to see how each week is structured, and how those week’s lead and build into a 4-6 week block of training, is a game changer for clients. It shows them where the process is going. As much as it is about the daily workout, the focus is more on the long-game. Are you building or are you dabbling? Are you hoping it gets easier, or are you planning to get stronger?

I won’t wax philosophical too much, but I will challenge your involvement with the success process. It’s as simple as checking-in. Once that becomes automatic, a connection is established that gets strengthened on a daily basis. For the client, knowing that I’m not judging what they did or didn’t do is crucial as well. I want to know and understand they “why” so we can implement some strategies and find other paths to success. It’s there, but we need engagement in the process in order to unlock your/our potential.

Check in. Utilize. Implement. Engage. Discover. Succeed.

Onward and Upward,

Jake

PS- I’ll leave you to ponder all of the crucial moments of your life where you were required to check in. Listed below are just a few examples.

  • Your first days of college. Checking in at the dorm, registering for classes, exploring options of engagement with the university and your peers.
  • Medical/dental/legal appointments.
  • Sports practices.
  • Job interviews and admissions interviews.
  • etc

The list can flow on and on. Give the process a certain importance and your actions will follow.

Massive Change / Simple Action

Forget the outcome and focus on the daily task.

I started to achieve, as an athlete and fitness professional when I looked at what I needed to do each day to progress. At first this was a “to-do” list of exercises, minutes, and miles. A list of foods to eat, and foods to avoid. Guidelines. Slowly, over time, this became a “feeling” that I sought in my daily movement and nutrition. Now I was thinking of how to win each day by finding satisfaction in feeling positive about my actions. This change was slow, and not something I set as an outcome, but it was revolutionary. It’s a mindset we utilize in other areas of our life, but often forget to apply to our fitness.

Win each moment. Recognize, when you made a bad choice, and take note of it. Don’t over dramatize it, but look at what led to that choice. Also, look at the impact of that choice. Sometimes the impact is small therefore you need not fret too much. Perspective.

  • Be present. Make cognizant purchasing decisions.
  • Know the purpose of the activity. During aerobic activity seek a feeling of flow. Look for those moments when it all clicks and you are locked into that positive state. When performing calisthenics or strength training recognize what each exercise requires, and work to maximize the effect of each movement.
  • Form follows function. The mode of fitness needs to be consistent with your desired outcome. Aesthetics differ from performance, greatly. The shape of your life should be based on your intended purpose.
  • Why. Stop here and really think about “why” you want to change. Make this a layered response. Meaning, start with you, add in your family, friends, and finally think of how you want the world to view you.

Do not focus on the time if you haven’t mastered the movement. Focus on the movements first, then increase the time your exercise or maximize the movements done in a specific time. Quality sticks. It progresses your forward. Quantity builds, but without quality, it promotes poor movement patterns and an outcome based, competitive focus. Their is a time for everything. Quality before quantity.

Your thoughts are a pattern. Master the pattern of thinking and decision making for daily success and you’ll achieve great things in your health and fitness.

A Call to Action

Fit. Healthy. Confident.

2013Superior100

A Call to Action.

Get Noticed. Be Different. Stay Successful.

Do you see how “fit, healthy, and confident” translates to “noticed, different, successful?” Now, do you think those words mean the same thing to all people? No. Everybody has a slightly different vision of their end-point. But, you can begin to understand that being fit and healthy will give you confidence. What might that look like? Well, to me it’s someone that stands out (getting noticed for being different), their presence is stronger than the rest of the group. A quiet confidence comes from knowing you’ve given yourself an edge over a vast majority of your peers (you are fit and healthy). You want success right? Well, take heed in knowing that by carving time out of your busy schedule and daily demands to “workout” and producing results from that time commitment is the ultimate representation of success. Make no mistake, physical fitness and the confidence that comes from knowing you are doing more in the same 24 hours that we are all given, is an elite edge.

Are you my ideal client? Do you want to be fit, healthy, and confident? Do you want to get noticed, stand out, and exude success? If so, I can help you gain the edge.

Your time is valuable. Unless you simply go through the motions day in and day out. Living the same complacent life as your parents, neighbors, or friends… a consistent acceptance of mediocrity. If so your time is not valuable. Your time is expendable. The throes of complacency have gripped you, wreaking havoc on your ability to manifest powerful images of success, and transform those thoughts into action.

It’s just a decision away. Stay on a health and fitness path (if any) that is not producing and eliciting, or do a 180 degree about face. Without decisive action you won’t make distinctive change.

In parting, you are closer than you think you are. You can handle more than you think you can. The future reveals an empty canvas of potential.

  • Focus on building an able body to take on and complete athletic competitions
  • Dial in your nutrition and obtain a complete understanding of your bodies response
  • Give yourself daily options to stay on the path of results and success
  • Maximum results / Minimum time
  • Give yourself an edge
  • Stand out wherever you make your presence felt
  • Become inspirational in your social and community circles

Mobile: 505.715.9316 / Email: jake@xclusivefitness.com / Local: Twin Cities Metro